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by Randall J. Strossen, Ph.D. | ©2014 IronMind

“Today was a very interesting milestone in the history of IronMind in Russia,” AerRus’s Oleg Chernov said on Sunday.

Under the auspices of the the Russian Armsport Association and the WAA (World Armlifting Association), the IronMind Rolling Thunder, a world standard for grip strength, made its debut in Moscow’s Red Square yesterday.  IronMind® | Oleg Chernov photo.
Under the auspices of the the Russian Armsport Association and the WAA (World Armlifting Association), the IronMind Rolling Thunder, a world standard for grip strength, made its debut in Moscow’s Red Square yesterday.  IronMind® | Oleg Chernov photo.


“We sponsored a little tournament in armwrestling and armlifting [competing on the Rolling Thunder], held by Russian Armsport Association and World Armlifting Association.

“The interesting thing about it is that the tournament was organized in the middle of Red Square, in the very heart of Russia,” Chernov said.

While Russia has produced some formidable performances on both Captains of Crush grippers and on the Rolling Thunder, on this occasion Chernov said, “This tournament was not weight result oriented.  It was more about making public presence of the sport, and gaining public interest.”

 
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by Randall J. Strossen, Ph.D. | ©2014 IronMind

The 2013 IHGF World Highland Games Strength Challenge will present eight events with “a combination of half strongman and half Highland Games events,” according to a press release sent to IronMind today.

Adam Darusz (shown on the 130-kg mill stone), as part of the IHGF, is helping to advance the Highland Games heavy events and related strength competitions in his native Hungary and surrounding countries.  Photo courtesy of Francis Brebner.
Adam Darusz (shown on the 130-kg mill stone), as part of the IHGF, is helping to advance the Highland Games heavy events and related strength competitions in his native Hungary and surrounding countries.  Photo courtesy of Francis Brebner.



The competition is being held June 15–16, during an event called “Teresiana,” in the city of Bjelovar, Croatia.

Croatia, Slovenia, Hungary, Georgia, Austria, France, Netherlands and Iceland will be represented, and the event is being promoted by András Ladányi, president of the Croatian Highland Games Federation, in affiliation with the IHGF.  

According to the press release, “The newly appointed CEO of the IHGF Adam Daruzs said the event will be filmed for European TV.  The sport is growing bigger in Hungary and with the TV exposure, this is having a big effect on other surrounding countries which is good for the sport and the athletes, which everyone is happy to see.”

      

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by Randall J. Strossen, Ph.D. | ©2014 IronMind

“Good news . . . Jon Andersen will be the MC for both days!,” Odd Haugen told IronMind today—referring to his strongman-mas wrestling-grip contest extravaganza at the NorCal FitExpo next month.

The Jon Andersen might be best known as a professional wrestler, but he was a formidable strongman competitor, too, and his trademark skull was the envy of shar peis worldwide, especially as it struck fear in the heart of big stones.  Here, Jon unloads on  the Atlas Stones at the 2004 World Muscle Power Championships, where he competed in a world class field that included  Zydrunas Savickas, Magnus Samuelsson, Mariusz Pudzianowski, Vasyl Virastyuk, Raimonds Bergmanis, Jessen Paulin, Mark Philippi, Rene Minkwitz, Dominic Filiou, Geoffrey Dolan and Hugo Girard.  IronMind® | Randall J. Strossen photo.
The Jon Andersen might be best known as a professional wrestler, but he was a formidable strongman competitor, too, and his trademark skull was the envy of shar peis worldwide, especially as it struck fear in the heart of big stones.  Here, Jon unloads on  the Atlas Stones at the 2004 World Muscle Power Championships, where he competed in a world class field that included  Zydrunas Savickas, Magnus Samuelsson, Mariusz Pudzianowski, Vasyl Virastyuk, Raimonds Bergmanis, Jessen Paulin, Mark Philippi, Rene Minkwitz, Dominic Filiou, Geoffrey Dolan and Hugo Girard.  IronMind® | Randall J. Strossen photo.


“Jon is dynamic and has a great deep voice.  He was a great strongman and is currently a professional catch wrestler with international fame,” Haugen said.

Here’s a link to the 2013 NorCal FitExpo, and direct links to the strongman, mas wrestling and grip strength competitions, where the Jon Andersen will be calling the action.

See you there!
                                                              

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by Randall J. Strossen, Ph.D. | ©2014 IronMind

Dan McKim lowered the boom on his fellow competitors at the Costa Mesa Highland Games, with a decisive win that included a personal best in the 56-lb. weight for distanc—IronMind has a report by IHGF president Francis Brebner.

Dan McKim hit a personal best 46’ 6” throw in the 56-lb. weight for distance, on his way to an overall victory at the 2013 Costa Mesa Highland Games.  IronMind® | Photo by Francis Brebner.
Dan McKim hit a personal best 46’ 6” throw in the 56-lb. weight for distance, on his way to an overall victory at the 2013 Costa Mesa Highland Games.  IronMind® | Photo by Francis Brebner.


2013 Costa Mesa Highland Games
by Francis Brebner, president, IHGF
 
The Costa Mesa Highland Games in Southern California this past weekend attracted mass crowds over its two days of festivities.  Over a 100 athletes competed in perfect weather, producing some fantastic throwing in all categories.
 
The pro class had a top-notch line-up of athletes, including Dan McKim, Rusty Price, Jon O’Neil, Jake Sullivan, and the new kid on the block competing in his first pro games, Guat Vail Howard.

Our first impression of McKim this season was how much bigger and stronger he looked than last season, and it showed with his dominating overall performance, winning every event.
 
In the first event with the 23-lb. Braemar stone, McKim took the win, hurling a putt of 42’ 1/2"; second was O’Neil with 41’ 11-1/2” and third Price with 39” 11-3/4”.
 
In the 56-lb. weight for distance, only two athletes managed throws over 40’.  McKim pulled a class throw of 46’ 6” for the win, setting a personal best.  Sullivan took second with 41’ 7-3/4”, followed by O’Neil at 38’ 9-1/2”.
 
The 16-lb. hammer was McKim’s next victory, with a winning throw of 133’ 1”.  In second place was Sullivan with 127’ 11” and third Price with 116’ 7”.
 
In the 22-lb. hammer, two athletes threw over 110’, with McKim notching up another victory at 116’ 7”.  Sullivan took second with 110’ 2” and Price third at 95’ 4-1/2”.
 
At this point, mid-afternoon in the first day of competition, SAAA president Dave Garman introduced the 21-caber veterans’ salute, which went over very well with the thousands of spectators.
 
The competition caber, which was 18’ 10” long and 130 lb., was very exciting to watch, with the win again going to McKim with three perfect 12 o’clock tosses.  In second place was O’Neil, who has been working hard on his caber, executing perfect timing with two 12 o’clocks.  In third place was Price with an 85-degree attempt.
 
The final event of the first day was the 56-lb challenge weight over the bar, which consisted of throwing a 56-lb. anvil with a ring attached, legal in length and weight.  McKim set a new field record of 16’ 7”.
 
Day two of the Costa Mesa Highland Games resumed with the 16-lb. open stone, which was won by McKim with a putt of 51’ 6-1/2”.  Sullivan came second with 50’ 2-1/2” and Price third with 47’ 11”.
 
The 28-lb. weight for distance was an exciting event, with McKim delivering a personal best throw of 85’ 5”.  Again Sullivan was in second with 83’ 2”, with O’Neil third at 72’ 11”.

The 20-lb. sheaf toss was won at a height of 32’ by McKim.  In second place was Sullivan with fewer misses than third-place O’Neil, both at 30’.
 
The final event with the challenge caber, boasted to be the biggest in the country at 18’ 3” long and 165 lb., with no taper at all, proved a real challenge for all the athletes, and the event was won by McKim with a best of 80 degrees.  The highlight of the competition was the world record attempt on the most number of cabers tossed simultaneously in the air:  a new record   of 36 was set and it was a thrilling sight to behold for the crowds.
 
Dave Garman, president of the SAAA, was delighted with how the weekend of Highland heavy athletics went and the many new athletes in the novice division competing for the first time.
 
Final points

1. Dan McKim 9.0
2. Jake Sullivan 23.0
3. Jon O’Neil 27.0
4. Rusty Price 31.0
5. Guat Vail Howard 45.0


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by Randall J. Strossen, Ph.D. | ©2014 IronMind

The brothers Sebastian and Lucas Wenta finished in a dead heat at Scotland’s Blackford Highland Games, edging out Scott Rider by two points—IronMind has a contest report by IHGF president Francis Brebner.


2013 Blackford Highland Games
by
 Francis Brebner, President, IHGF
 
The Blackford Highland Games contested in Scotland this past weekend had glorious sun and a nice cooling breeze, attracting more than 3000 spectators who had come to watch eleven top heavies battle it out in seven events.  Athletes who shared top billing were Scotland’s Craig Sinclair and Grant Sinclair, Bruce Robb, Stuart Anderson, and Sinclair Patience; England’s Scott Rider; and Poland’s Sebastian Wenta and Lucasz Wenta.
 
In the opening event with the 16-lb. shot, L. Wenta won with an impressive putt of 58’ 3” over Rider, who placed second with 55’ 11”, with S. Wenta in third at 53’ 7” and Patience in fourth with 49’ 7”.
 
The 22-lb. shot was a close event between the top two, with L. Wenta pulling out the winning putt of 49” and Rider mere inches behind at 48’ 10”.  S. Wenta took third at 47’ 7”and Patience fourth with a very respectable 42’ 9”.
 
The 28-lb. weight for distance was for the British Championships, and it was another close match, with the top three athletes going at it round after round.  S. Wenta secured the win with a throw of 82’ 10”, which he pulled out on his last attempt to jump from third to first place. Second was Rider at 82’ 5”, third Patience at 80’ 8”, and fourth L. Wenta at 79’ 2”.
 
The 16-lb. hammer was a clear win for C. Sinclair, with a throw of 134’ 10”.  Second place was L. Wenta at 129’ 8”, third Patience at 127’ 4”, and fourth S. Wenta at 125”.
 
In the 22-lb. hammer, C. Sinclair was in a realm of his own, winning with a majestic throw of 116’ 3”.  Second was S. Wenta at 105’ 11”, third L. Wenta at 104’ 11”, and fourth Rider at 102’ 9”.
 
The caber toss ended in a tie between Rider, S. Wenta, and Robb, who all produced perfect 12 o’clock throws.  Fourth equal were C. Sinclair and L. Wenta at 12:02.
 
The 56-lb. weight over the bar witnessed another great competition between Rider, S. Wenta and L. Wenta, all tying at a height of 15’.  Fourth place was a tie between C. Sinclair and Patience at 14’.
 
Final points

1. S. Wenta and L. Wenta (tie) 32.0
3. Scott Rider 30.0
4. Craig Sinclair 21.0
5. Sinclair Patience  17.5
6. Bruce Robb  13.5


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by Randall J. Strossen, Ph.D. | ©2014 IronMind

“As it has been a habit, the Ironmind Grip Classic Vol. 3 (2013) is getting bigger each year,” contest organizer Jyrki Rantanen told IronMind.

The men’s world record for the CoC (Captains of Crush) Silver Bullet has already been set twice on Finnish soil.  Is a third one on its way?  IronMind® | Photo by www.photobypiia.com.
The men’s world record for the CoC (Captains of Crush) Silver Bullet has already been set twice on Finnish soil.  Is a third one on its way?  IronMind® | Photo by www.photobypiia.com.


“This time it will be a part of Fitnesstukku Power Weekend in Helsinki, Finland in November.  The events for the qualifications are Rolling Thunder, Apollon´s Axle and the CoC Silver Bullet with the qualification limits mentioned below:

Qualifying Standards (women/men)
Rolling Thunder: 50 kg/80 kg
Apollon's Axle: 80 kg/140 kg
CoC Silver Bullet: 5 sec* / 10 sec** 

*Captains of Crush No. 2 gripper  
**Captains of Crush No. 3 gripper


“All who do the limits in the qualifications are free to come (with their own cost) to the finals in Fitnesstukku Power Weekend (November) in Helsinki, Finland.

“The finals will also include IronMind Hub-walk (like farmer's) and the last man/woman standing lifting starts from these qualifying standards.

“So far the following events are qualifications and if some country which is not mentioned here would like to have a qualification, please contact info@unitedstrongmen.com before the end of May.

Norway, Valhalla Gym, June (contact: Eirik Ingebritsen)
USA, Ironmind Record Breakers, June 30 (contact: Odd Haugen)
Ukraine, Gurzuf, June 30 (contact: Andrey Sharkoff, president, Armlifting–Ukraine)
Russia, A-1, Moscow, July 28–29 (contact: Nikolay Vitkevich, president, Armlifting–Russia)
Sweden, Eazy Gym/Ystad, August 11 (contact: Anders Lindbladh)

“And in Finland, there is at least six qualification opportunities via Fitnesstukku Power Tour (contact: Jyrki Rantanen) in the following cities between May-September: Tampere, Helsinki, Hämeenlinna, Leppävirta, Oulu and Merikarvia.

“The first stage was set last Saturday in Leppävirta, with Timo Nissinen and Jukka Vesterinen taking a strong grip to the spots for finals. The next stage will be June 13 in Oulu.

“So, at the moment we are having 11 qualifications in 6 different countries, but we welcome new countries in also.

“We are working on the prizes at the moment, but already we can confirm that along with the trophies the winners of each class are awarded with Police/Festina watches and the top three in each class will get supplement packs worth of US$300-200-100, but we might have something bigger coming also so stay tuned.”

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by Randall J. Strossen, Ph.D. | ©2014 IronMind

Contested in “in heavy rain on an ice-cold day,” the MHP Strongman Champions League was unfazed by bad weather and Icelander Hafthor Julius Bjornsson probably felt right at home as he “won the competition, followed by a new Latvian star, Dainis Zageris,” Marcel Mostert told IronMind.


Here’s the field at the 2013 MHP Strongman Champions League–Latvia competition.  Hafthor Julius Bjornsson (Iceland) won, and two new strongman stars emerged:  Dainis Zageris (Latvia) and Meelis Peelis (Estonia).  IronMind® | Photo courtesy of SCL.
Here’s the field at the 2013 MHP Strongman Champions League–Latvia competition.  Hafthor Julius Bjornsson (Iceland) won, and two new strongman stars emerged:  Dainis Zageris (Latvia) and Meelis Peil (Estonia).  IronMind® | Photo courtesy of SCL.



“Dainis showed his power, as he is in the best shape of his life now and he crushed the field with such names as Misha Koklyaev, Johannes Arsjo and Ervin Katona.

“The mighty Icelander ‘Thor” was still too much for him, but maybe that’s also a matter of time.

“In third place finished another new star, Meelis Peil from Estonia.  He did very well, with an impressive second place on the Conan’s Wheel and all other events in the top five.

“Dainis broke the Latvian record on the Power Stairs, that time was in hands of Raimonds Bergmanis.  Raimunds was just proud of him for that, as he was the announcer at the competition.
 
“The Viking Press world record didn’t get broken:  Record holder Ervin Katona (13 reps at 165 kg) couldn’t do more than 10 reps, equalled by Dainis Zageris, for another Latvian record.
 
“It was a pity that it rained the whole day because the place, equipment and the crowd were perfect.  With many thanks to SCL co-partner AB Build.
 
 “It was a great event in Latvia, so nice to be back there again, as it is the country where the first SCL competition ever started.  Contracts are already signed for the next year to do again an SCL stage,” said Mostert.
 

Official Scores: Top Ten Points

Rank Athlete (country) Latvia Overall
1. Thor Bjornsson (Iceland) 74.5 25.0
2. Dainis Zageris (Latvia0   69.5 18.0
3. Meelis Peil (Estonia) 56.0 15.0
4. Misha Koklyeav (Russia)  52.0 12.0
5. Johannes Arsjo (Sweden)  50.5 10.0
6. Ervin Katona (Serbia)  47.5 8.0
7. Tomi Lotta (Finland) 42.5 6.0
8. Oskars Martuzans (Latvia) 41.0 5.0
9. Martin Wildauer (Austria) 40.5 4.0
10. Mareks Leitis (Latvia) 36.5 3.0


 
For full details, please visit the official SCL website.   The next stage is SCL Czech on June 8—watch for the official announcement on IronMind.

Dainis Zageris (Latvia) brushed aside all competitors but one at MHP SCL–Serbia, serving notice that he’s hunting for scalps in the strongman world.  IronMind® | Photo courtesy of SCL.                                                                 ###
Dainis Zageris (Latvia) brushed aside all competitors but one at MHP SCL–Serbia, serving notice that he’s hunting for scalps in the strongman world.  IronMind® | Photo courtesy of SCL.

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by Randall J. Strossen, Ph.D. | ©2014 IronMind

“On behalf of David Webster, OBE this is an announcement that the New Hampshire Highland Games will be hosting the 2013 Webster Scottish Heavy Events World Championships,” Dr. Bill Crawford, NHHG Chairman of the Athletics Committee told IronMind.

“Mr. Webster has conducted an invitational Heavy Events World Championships for over 30 years and this year will be no exception.  



“An international field of the best Scottish Heavies will collect on the weekend of September 20, 21, 22 at Loon Mountain and battle for the Webster Cup, the award that will go the World Champion. The indefatigable Mr. Webster will continue the legacy of crowning a World Champion, a process that will continue well into the future.”

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by Randall J. Strossen, Ph.D. | ©2014 IronMind

Club Fitness24 in Kokomo, Indiana is hosting the ASC Masters’ Americas’ Strongest Man contest on June 15 and “the winner will qualify for the Masters‘ Worlds to be held in Belfast, Northern Ireland August 24–25,” Chad Coy told IronMind.

 
“Brad Dunn is returning to defend his title and those looking to knock him off are Karl Gillingham, Matt Metheney, Mike Gill, Jefferson Meadors, Bryan Neese, and Chad Coy.  Last year Brad could not go to World's so Chad Coy took his place and took 2nd.  This year America could have two men headed to worlds since making the podium gets you invited back!,” said Coy.

Later that day, the the 16th edition of the NAS Central USA Strongman/Strongwoman Challenge will take place in what Coy called “the Granddaddy of American Strongman [and][ the proceeds go to the Susan G. Komen foundation for breast cancer research.

“During the day local health care professionals will be performing free health screenings...including free breast exams, blood pressure, cholesterol, blood sugar, body composition, and BMI,” said Coy.

The events will be: farmers walk, yoke walk, log press, train wheel dead lift, keg load medley and the stones of strength.

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by Randall J. Strossen, Ph.D. | ©2014 IronMind

Take a moment this weekend to remember loved ones, people who have served our country, everyone who has touched your life directly and indirectly—and to help pay for a picnic or other celebration, IronMind is giving you a 15% off code on full-priced items good May 24 through May 27, 2013.

Memorial Day sale at IronMind:  Remember and save!  Captains of Crush grippers, Zenith grippers, Vulcan Racks, ALight Training Centers, Buffalo Bars, Just Protein, Strong-Enough Lifting Straps, Rolling Thunders, back issues of MILO and much more.  ©IronMind Enterprises, Inc.
Memorial Day sale at IronMind:  Remember and save!  Captains of Crush grippers, Zenith grippers, Vulcan Racks, ALight Training Centers, Buffalo Bars, Just Protein, Strong-Enough Lifting Straps, Rolling Thunders, back issues of MILO and much more.  ©IronMind Enterprises, Inc.


Remember and save at the IronMind e-store: May 24 through May 27.
 
No double discounts, and this does not apply to kits, sets, combos, or other discounted packages, along with a few things such as MILO subscriptions and Eleiko barbells, but if you’ve been waiting for a good time to add another CoC gripper to your collection, want to try our the new Zenith gripper or to equip your home gym with Vulcan Racks, a Buffalo Bar or our revolutionary ALight Training Center, the time’s never been better.

To get your discount, please add the code MEMDAY13 in the keycode box at View Basket when you are checking out from the IronMind e-store.

Questions?  Email sales@ironmind.com for a quick reply.

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by Randall J. Strossen, Ph.D. | ©2014 IronMind

“The 4th stage of the  MHP Strongman Champions League will arrive this Saturday in Latvia,” Marcel Mostert reported to IronMind.



MHP Strongman Champions League Latvia is this weekend—Latvia is where SCL held its first contest, in 2008.  IronMind® | Photo courtesy of MHP Strongman Champions League.
MHP Strongman Champions League Latvia is this weekend—Latvia is where SCL held its first contest, in 2008.  IronMind® | Photo courtesy of MHP Strongman Champions League.


“It will be a spectacular competition and its good to be back in Latvia, the country were the first SCL stage ever started in 2008.

“The number 2, 3, 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10 of the SCL ranking so far in the 2013 series will be present in this competition.  Kryzsztof Radzikowski, the current number one from the ranking couldn’t be here as he has the Polish Nationals this weekend, but will he be in the next stages.

“It will be a hard fight again for the title, prize money and SCL ranking points," said Mostert.
The competition will start at 2 pm.                      
 
Competitors
1.  Johannes Arsjo (Sweden)
2.  Hafthor Julius Bjornsson (Iceland)             
3.  Tomi Lotta (Finland)        
4.  Misha Koklyaev (Russia)     
5.  Rob Frampton (England)            
6.  Martin Wildauer  (Austria)                           
7.  Ervin Katona (Serbia)               
8.  Jan Wagenaar (Holland)                          
9.  Meelis  Peilis (Estonia)             
10. Saulius Brusokas (Lithuania)
11. Dainis Zageris (Latvia)
12. Agris Kazelniks (Latvia)
13. Mareks Leitis (Latvia)
14. Didzis Zarins (Latvia)
 
Events
•  Power Team Forward Hold: 12.5 kg
•  MHP Viking Press: 165 kg
•  Keg Toss: 18, 20, 22, 24, 26, 28 kg
•  Power Stairs: 225, 250, 275 kg
•  Giant Circle: 360 kg
•  Dead Lift for Maximum: starting weight 360 kg
 
A promo from the SCL Latvia can be found at the SCL website on this link.
 
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by Randall J. Strossen, Ph.D. | ©2014 IronMind

Coming straight from Siberia, Mas wrestlers will be conducting a clinic at the NorCal FitExpo on Saturday, June 29, so you can hone your skills for the US Open Mas Wrestling Championships on Sunday, June 30.

Mas wrestling: brace your feet, grab the stick and pull.  The NorCal FitExpo will give you a chance to learn from the best and to put your skills to the test in the inaugural US Mas Wrestling Championships.  IronMind® | Photo courtesy of the International Mas Wrestling Federation.
Mas wrestling: brace your feet, grab the stick and pull.  The NorCal FitExpo will give you a chance to learn from the best and to put your skills to the test in the inaugural US Mas Wrestling Championships.  IronMind® | Photo courtesy of the International Mas Wrestling Federation.


Strongman promoter Vlad Redkin began introducing Mas wrestling to strongman and then earlier this year Odd Haugen featured the sport at the LA FitExpo, where it proved popular with both the competitors and the audience. 

Kicking things up a level, Haugen is returning with more Mas wrestling at the NorCal FitExpo in June: a clinic will be held on Saturday, June 29, followed by the inaugural US Open Mas Wrestling Championships on Sunday, June 30.   "This is an opportunity for American strength athletes to participate in International Championships in ‘new’ sport," said Haugen.
 
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Visit the IronMind Forum: talk strength, discuss this story.  Strongman, grip, Highland Games, Olympic lifting, stones and more. 

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by Randall J. Strossen, Ph.D. | ©2014 IronMind

“The Rio Grande Valley Highland Games in New Mexico celebrated twenty five year of consecutive games in style with the hosting of the 2013 Scottish Masters World Highland Games Championships this past weekend.,” Francis Brebner reported to IronMind.

Jake Sullivan won the pro class at the Rio Grande Highland Games Championships.  IronMind® | Francis Brebner photo.
Jake Sullivan won the pro class at the Rio Grande Highland Games Championships.  IronMind® | Francis Brebner photo.


A total of one hundred and seven Masters Athletes traveled from all over the World with many coming from as far afield as Scotland, Germany, England, Japan, Canada, Ireland and the USA.  

“In the Woman’s Masters 50 plus category Terry Ventress come into this competition prepared and on top of her games and created a total of four World records.  Other world records that tumbled in the woman’s class were in the 40-49 group which were set by Erica Hay.

“In the men’s Category in the 50-54 Brent Abbott set a world record in the 16-lb. Sheaf Toss with a height of 34’ and in the 50-59 class, Rick Kremar set a new world record with the 42-lb. weight over the bar of 18’1”.

“The Professional division on the Sunday had a great line up which included Sean Betz, Ryan Stewart, Beau Fay, Chad Gustin, Jeremy Gillingham and the three new rookie pros to the games circuit Jon O’Neil, Spencer Tyler and Jake Sullivan.

Overall: Professional Class

1. Jake Sullivan 22.5
2. Sean Betz 23.0
3. Spencer Tyler 39.0
4. Ryan Stewart 40.0
5. Jon O'Neil 42.5
6. Jeremy Gillingham 43.0
7. Chad Gustin 49.5
8. Beau Frey 64.5

“The Masters World Championships in my view was one of the best organized games I have been involved for such a large amount of athletes competing over a single day championship which had one hundred and seven athletes throwing in all nine events which ran very smoothly with no interruption in the program of events," said Brebner.

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by Randall J. Strossen, Ph.D. | ©2014 IronMind

Author Paul Ohl told IronMind, “The year 2013 commemorates the 150th anniversary of the Canadian legendary strongman Louis Cyr [and] it kicks off with the publication of a special edition of Louis Cyr’s biography, a joint venture between Les Éditions Libre Expression, the publisher of the original book, and Christal Films, the producer of the movie to be released on this coming July.”

Here is the dust jacket for the new, special edition of Paul Ohl’s biography of the legendary Canadian strongman Louis Cyr.   IronMind® | Image courtesy of Libre Expression/ Christal Films.
Here is the dust jacket for the new, special edition of Paul Ohl’s biography of the legendary Canadian strongman Louis Cyr.   IronMind® | Image courtesy of Libre Expression/ Christal Films.


“The cover of the book features Antoine Bertrand [who plays Cyr in the film] striking the traditional Louis Cyr’s strongman pose.  The book adds three new chapters, all about modern strongman, plus a final chapter titled ‘the strongest man of the 20th century.’

“May has been ‘Cyr’s lucky month’ throughout a more than 20 years’ strongman career:
-It was in May 20, 1883 ( 130 years ago today) that Louis Cyr, not quite 20 years old, lifted from ground to shoulder height the famous 517-lb natural stone. It happened on that Sunday noon, at the Suffolk Mill Dumb yard, before a crowd of more than 4000.
-On May 27, 1895, at the Austin and Stone’s Museum in Boston, Mass, Louis Cyr performed what is still considered as one of the greatest strongman feat : the 4337-lb. backlift.
-On May 8, 1896, at the St. Louis Hall in Chicago,Ill, Louis Cyr performed a one-arm clean and press of a 162-lb. dumbbell for 36 reps, a 1897-lb. partial deadlift , a 987-lb. one-arm partial deadlift, plus a 7.5-ton total poundage for 7 strength tests in less than 2 hours.

“A substantial number of Louis Cyr’s great lifts and performances, such as the the holding of pairs of horses will be featured in the movie,” said Ohl.

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by Randall J. Strossen, Ph.D. | ©2014 IronMind

Marcel Mostert has just sent IronMind a report on the MHP Strongman Champions League contest in Serbia, where Ervin Katona held off Martin “The Deadlift Kid” Wildauer for the title.

Ervin Katona, wearing the Fan Favorite shirt at the MHP Strongman Champions League Serbia on the 25-kg weight for height.  IronMind® | Vladimir Velickovic photo.
Ervin Katona, wearing the Fan Favorite shirt at the MHP Strongman Champions League Serbia on the 25-kg weight for height.  IronMind® | Vladimir Velickovic photo.
 

This was the third stage of the MHP Strongman Champions League 2013 season and “The Austrian ‘Deadlift Kid’ was in a super shape and finished on second place, just 2 points behind Ervin,” Mostert said.  “He won the weight for height with 25 kg in a personal record over 5.60 meter.  He also did an attempt  for a new world record at 5.80 meters, but just missed it by a few centimeters.


“The new Latvian champion, Dainis Zageris, got a second place on the weight for height with 5.40 meter and a third place overall.  A personal record for him as well.  Tomi Lotta was wearing the MHP/SCL leader shirt as the highest ranked athlete and Ervin Katona won the MHP Fan Favorite Strongman shirt.
 
“Jan Wagenaar from Holland did well with a sixth place, his best in an SCL contest so far.  Johannes Arsjo got a little injury during the 360-kg frame walk and was very disappointed.  Still, A beautiful sunny day with great crowd in a fantastic atmosphere made the competition a very succesful and exciting day,” said Mostert.

Overall results:

Pl Athlete Serbia Overall
1. Ervin Katona (Serbia) 63.0 25.0
2. Martin Wildauer (Germany) 61.0 18.0
3. Dainis Zageris (Latvia 54.5 15.0
4. Lauri Nami (Estonia) 45.5 12.0
5. Tomi Lotta (Finland) 41.5 10.0
6. Jan Wagenaar (Holland) 37.5 8.0
7. Sebastian Kurek (Poland) 27.5 6.0
8. Akos Nagy (Hungary)   24.0 5.0
9. Johannes Arsjo* (Sweden) 20.5 4.0
10. Radojca Marinkovic (Serbia) 18.5 3.0
11. Alen Radosevic (Serbia) 18.0 2.0
12.  Paul Pirjol (Romania) 17.0 1.0

*injured
 
The next stage of the MHP Strongman Champions League will be this coming weekend in Latvia, on May 25.

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by Randall J. Strossen, Ph.D. | ©2014 IronMind

Joefrey Wibrin said he “discovered grip training six years ago while searching to improve his grip for deadlift training,“ and one thing must have led to another because he’s just been certified on the Captains of Crush No. 3 gripper, proving his world class grip strength.


In the above picture Joefrey is teeth lifting his son, "showing that he has more than one trick up his sleeve.  I would be proud to teach my sons, Nils and Noé, what is mind and body strength about,” he told IronMind.  Joefrey Wibrin is the latest man to be certified on the Captains of Crush No. 3 gripper.  40-years young, Joefrey stand 5’ 11” tall and weighs 204 lb.  IronMind® | Photo courtesy of Joefrey Wibrin.
In the above picture Joefrey is teeth lifting his son, "showing that he has more than one trick up his sleeve.  I would be proud to teach my sons, Nils and Noé, what is mind and body strength about,” he told IronMind.  Joefrey Wibrin is the latest man to be certified on the Captains of Crush No. 3 gripper.  40-years young, Joefrey stand 5’ 11” tall and weighs 204 lb.  IronMind® | Photo courtesy of Joefrey Wibrin.


“At IronMind, I didn’t only find the best equipment on the market but I also had access to the best informations about hand strength. From then, it wasn't long before I was bitten by gripper bug!,” Wibrin said.

“First time I grab a CoC No. 3, I said to myself: It will only be a collector's piece! That day I understood the level of strength one must have to close it. After several months of ferocious battles and a lot of skin lost, I was able to close the No. 2 and the No. 2.5.  Then I considered the possibility to eventually close the No. 3.

“I have set up small targets and they came one after another. It's a long road to achieve such a goal (i.e., closing a strong gripper) and you need milestones to never lose your way. They help you to keep away from giving up. What serves me most is iron will (and patience of course!)”

“Thanks again to IronMind for this beautiful challenge. Many thanks to Andy de Pooter, the official referee, for making this certification possible.”

Congratulations, Joefrey (and many thanks for your kind words!); your name has been added to the official Captains of Crush No. 3 certification list, and thank you Andy de Pooter for serving as the referee on Joefrey’s official attempt

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by Randall J. Strossen, Ph.D. | ©2014 IronMind

With the IWF elections drawing near, most of the discussion is about a change in leadership—whether citing lengthy reports, accounts in the press or personal anecdotes, plenty of serious questions have been raised about unreported funds, massive cash transactions and curious patterns in the sport’s doping control procedures.  



A lifter like Ilya Ilyin can’t help but inspire with his performances—generating excitement far beyond the inner circle of the sport.  It is time for weightlifting to cast off its blinders, quit doing business as usual and enter the 21st century.  IronMind® | Randall J. Strossen photo.
A lifter like Ilya Ilyin can’t help but inspire with his performances—he is fully capable of generating excitement far beyond the inner circle of the sport.  It is time for weightlifting to cast off its blinders, quit doing business as usual and enter the 21st century.  IronMind® | Randall J. Strossen photo.


Certainly, there is good reason to consider a substantial overhaul in terms of how the sport of weightlifting conducts business because if it were a business, it most likely already would have declared bankruptcy and some of its leaders been deposed, if not brought to trial.

Serious stuff, but let’s leave those matters to others and dwell on something that while lacking the tabloid element is an even more serious indication that things have gone seriously wrong in the sport and whoever captains the ship in the future needs to have a much different sense of where he is headed.

In short, the sport of weightlifting is dying, a relic of the last century, mired in an approach spawned in the Cold War era and one that takes its operating cues from a socialist approach to sport, rather than one based on the open market reality of the 21st century. 

So, power is consolidated in the hands of a few, who rule imperially, and rather than building a sustainable enterprise that can thrive without limit in the market, we have an approach that limps along via government grants, payments for drug fines, and marking up the hotel rooms that the competitors and officials participating in major championships are required to stay in—all the while turning those contests into bloated week-long affairs aimed more at building quantity (think hotel revenue and entry fees) than quality. 

Been to a major weightlifting championships lately?  See any real spectators?  How about the sponsors?  Or the kids clamoring to get into the sport?

Instead, you’re in a large hall with the bottom third dominated by the stage and the many handfuls of officials who oversee lifting that takes place in what is virtually an empty arena—the only people in the stands are coaches, athletes and significant others.

Of course, there are exceptions, as we have seen with Pyrros Dimas in Greece or Naim Suleymanoglu in Turkey or, more broadly, for the 2011 World Championships in Paris, but generally speaking, the sport exists in a social vacuum.  Why?

Is it that strength is not recognized or appreciated?  Or that the snatch and clean and jerk are too obscure?

This is hardly the case because TWI was smart enough to launch a TV show, created by Barry Frank, called the World’s Strongest Man in 1977.  It has a huge global viewership and continues through all these years—a fabulous success by any television standard.  The world’s strongest man?  Sounds like the birthright of weightlifting to me, so who was in command when a TV show waltzed away with this title?  Would the CEO turn a blind eye and escape pointed questions from his board and his shareholders if the formula for Coca-Cola were stolen on his watch?

And as for the lifts themselves, consider that CrossFit, which began in a garage about a decade ago, is now a business worth in the range of US$50,000,000 and it’s projected to possibly grow tenfold.  Guess what’s among its core movements?  The snatch and the clean and jerk.  In fact, ask people who are doing these lifts what they are doing and they’re likely to say, “CrossFit.”

Speaking with my Eurosport colleague David Goldstrom, who heads a company called Televison in Europe and first came to weightlifting in 1995, he mentioned that Eurosport alone had approximately 31,000,000 viewers during this year’s Senior European Weightlifting Championships in Tirana, Albania, which he called “very good viewing” and said “there might be another 10,000,000 from the other countries.”

Goldstrom sees this as a clear indication of the sport’s untapped potential: “There is so much more we could be doing.  The sport is fast moving, it has a strong climax . . . everyone understands strength,” he said.

Cutting to the chase, I asked Goldstrom to grade the sport (giving it anything from an A to an F) in terms of making the public aware of and appreciative of it. 

“C is as far as I could go,” he said.  And in terms of capitalizing on its assets, Goldstrom gave the sport “a definite F.”

Goldstrom, incidentally, was quick to praise the organizers of the 2011 European Weightlifting Championships in Kazan, Russia for having done an unusually good job in terms of things like staging and facility management, and the 2011 World Weightlifting Championships in Paris, France for presenting a theater-like stage and for attracting a  bigger audience than could be accommodated within the hall, day after day. 

I would second those and add that what Antonio Urso and David Goldstrom brought to the 2008 Senior European Weightlifting Championships (Lignano Sabbiadoro, Italy) deserves special mention for what I called “Best Staging, Best Lighting . . . The New Look of Weightlifting” (MILO, September 2008, Vol. 16, No. 2, p. 25).

Incidentally, while it’s easy to cast the marketing failures of the sport in ideological terms, there is no requirement that success must come in the form of a Harvard MBA or a shirtsleeves California entrepreneur:  My first serious discussion about how weightlifting needed to do a better job of promoting itself was with the Chinese coach Xiong Han Yang, and it was president of the Chinese Weightlifting Association, Ma Wenguang, who kindly agreed to send his 2004 Olympic gold medalists Shi Zhiyong and Zhang Guozheng and coach Chen Wen Bin to the USA for an exhibition IronMind had organized at the 2005 Arnold Sports Festival, in what was the first time weightlifting was featured on the main exposition hall stage.

Whether it’s finances or drugs, the rules of the business must be followed or sanctions should be expected.  It’s also the case that businesses that do not adapt to meet the demands of the marketplace will go the way of the dinosaur and the buggy whip. 

It’s time for weightlifting to clean up its act and get with the times: out with the old and in with the new.

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by Randall J. Strossen, Ph.D. | ©2014 IronMind

The 2013 season of the Strongman Canada League opened at Sherbrooke, Quebec—featuring the biggest names in Canadian strongman in a show that was filmed for TV by Canal D.

Jean-Francois Caron on his way to victory at the inaugural competition in Strongman Canada League’s 2013 season.  IronMind® | Photo courtesy of Jean-Francois Caron.
Jean-Francois Caron on his way to victory at the inaugural competition in Strongman Canada League’s 2013 season.  IronMind® | Photo courtesy of Jean-Francois Caron.


Featuring a match up between Jean-Francois Caron, Christian Savoie and Louis-Philippe Jean, this was an 8-event contest held over two days.

Contest highlights included a new Canadian record  of 340 lb. for 16 reps on the Viking Press by Jacki Ouellet.

Official Results

1. Jean-Francois Caron 71.0
2. Christian Savoie 65.0
3. Louis-Philippe Jean 58.0
4. Jacki Ouellet 56.0
5. Scott Cummine 43.0
6. Maxime Boudreault 42.5
7. Mike Saunders 40.0
8. Paul Vaillancourt 29.0
9. Luke Skaarup 21.5
10. Maxim Lemir 12.0


Strongman Canada League continues in Warwick, Quebec on July 7-8th, although Jean-Francois Caron told IronMind, “I will be not here because  SCL China is on the same date.”

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by Randall J. Strossen, Ph.D. | ©2014 IronMind

“We are preparing for the MHP Strongman Champions League Serbia which will happen coming weekend in Novi Sad, the second biggest city in Serbia,” Marcel Mostert told IronMind today.

Powered by MHP, the 2013 Strongman Champions League season continues in Serbia this weekend:  “The weather will be hot, 30 degrees (86 F), the arena beautiful, and the athletes fired up for the title and the prize money," Marcel Mostert told IronMind.  IronMind® | Image courtesy of SCL.
Powered by MHP, the 2013 Strongman Champions League season continues in Serbia this weekend:  “The weather will be hot, 30 degrees (86 F), the arena beautiful, and the athletes fired up for the title and the prize money," Marcel Mostert told IronMind.  IronMind® | Image courtesy of SCL.



“This is the 3rd stage of the MHP/SCL series out of 16.  Next week the SCL Latvia will be done, followed by SCL Czech and SCL Holland.

“It will be busy weeks and all top athletes around the world will appear in one or more shows in this period: Misha Koklyaev, Vytautas Lalas, Terry Hollands, Laurence Shahlaei, Krzystof Radzikowski and maybe even Zydrunas Savickas,” said Mostert.
 
Start List
Ervin Katona (Serbia)
Johannes Arsjo (Sweden)
Paul Pirjol (Romania)           
Sebastian Kurek (Poland)              
Tomi Lotta (Finland)                                                        
Jan Wagenaar (Holland)                          
Martin Wildauer (Germany)          
Lauri Nami (Estonia)             
Dainis Zageris (Latvia)                
Akos Nagy (Hungary)           
TBD* (Serbia)
TBD* Serbia (Serbia)

*to be determined
 
Events
Atlas Stones
Truck Pull
Power Team Forward Hold
MHP Viking Press
Farmer's Walk
Weight for Height.
 
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by Randall J. Strossen, Ph.D. | ©2014 IronMind

24-year old Yusuke Nakamura has just been certified on the Captains of Crush No. 3 gripper, the best known benchmark for world class grip strength, but not content to stop there, he said “I will try No. 4 certification in future and succeed [with] it.”

The Captains of Crush No. 3 gripper was no match for 177 cm (about 5’ 9-1/2”) and 85 kg (about 187 lb.), Yusuke Nakamura, who has been training grip strength since he was 10 years old.  IronMind® | Photo courtesy of Yusuke Nakamura.
The Captains of Crush No. 3 gripper was no match for 177 cm (about 5’ 9-1/2”) and 85 kg (about 187 lb.), Yusuke Nakamura, who has been training grip strength since he was 10 years old.  IronMind® | Photo courtesy of Yusuke Nakamura.


“I began to train my grip strength when I was 10 years old and have been training for 14 years,” Nakamura said.  “When I was 16 years old, I closed No. 3 CoC Gripper for the first time.  I have done 100 pushups with only thumbs.

Presumably measured on a hand dynamometer, Nakaumura said, “When I was 18 years old, my grip strength exceeded 100 kg (220 lb.) and now [is] over 120 kg (264 lb.).  My personal best [on the] Rolling Thunder is 100 kg (220 lb.).  I’m also doing block weight training.”

Longterm dedications pays off: Congratulations to Yusuke Nakamura—your name has been added to the official Captains of Crush No. 3 gripper certification list—and many thanks to Mitchell Troop for serving as the referee on Yusuke Nakamura’s official attempt to close the CoC No. 3.

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http://www.ironmind.com/ironmind/opencms/Main/captainsofcrush2.html

http://www.ironmind.com/ironmind/opencms/Main/rednail_roster.html
 


by Randall J. Strossen, Ph.D. | ©2014 IronMind

“We had a very busy contest day [Saturday]; 22 competitors for the British Grip Champs, and 8 armwrestling supermatches too – so we had to keep things moving!,” David Horne reported to IronMind.

Poor weather was no challenge for the group gathered at David Horne’s British Grip Championships and arm wrestling supermatch in Stafford, England.  IronMind® | Photo courtesy of David Horne.
Poor weather was no challenge for the group gathered at David Horne’s British Grip Championships and arm wrestling supermatch in Stafford, England.  IronMind® | Photo courtesy of David Horne.


“This is the second biggest British Grip Champs since its start in 1991.  We had an armwrestling supermatch after each grip event, and this worked very well. The grip guys loved watching the professional armwrestling, and many armwrestlers got stuck into the grip contest, did very well, and can’t wait for the next comp!
 
“Some of these even carried on after a tough supermatch. Also both hands were tested in the grip contest, so there was no hiding for a tired arm!
 
“Anyway a great day was had by all, and even after a long day of competing the guys still did another hour plus of armwrestling training and grip stuff!
Only downer was the rain, cold temperature and the wind, but the marquee did the business,” Horne said.
 
Here are the top ten:



1. David Horne 6.0
2. Rob Russell 20.0
3. Richie Bevan 34.0
4. Carl Coffey 38.5
5. Chris Lowe 39.0
6. Steve Harris 46.0
7. Gary Browne 56.5
8. Tom Holland 57.0
9. Elizabeth Horne 60.0
10. Paul Mitchell 75.0

Please visit David Horne’s website for full details.

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by Randall J. Strossen, Ph.D. | ©2014 IronMind

In 2008, IronMind received a photo and video clips of Peter Mortensen doing one-arm pullups on a Rolling Thunder—needless to say, Peter had our attention!

Peter Mortensen, a rock climber from Denmark, does a one-arm pull-up on a Rolling Thunder® Revolving Deadlift Handle:  “There seems to be a strong correlation between strength on revolving handles or dumbbells (especially thick handles) and climbing hand strength . . .,” Peter told us.  Reprinted from the 2009 IronMind® catalog - Volume Eighteen, with permission.  IronMind® | Photo courtesy of Peter Mortensen.
Peter Mortensen, a rock climber from Denmark, does a one-arm pull-up on a Rolling Thunder® Revolving Deadlift Handle:  “There seems to be a strong correlation between strength on revolving handles or dumbbells (especially thick handles) and climbing hand strength . . .,” Peter told us.  Reprinted from the 2009 IronMind® catalog - Volume Eighteen, with permission.  IronMind® | Photo courtesy of Peter Mortensen.
 

As indicated by that performance, Peter Mortensen is capable of some remarkable feats of strength but what’s also evident is that as fierce as he is in his workouts, you can also feel a tremendous sense of joy and even though you are watching the limits of human exertion, you feel as if Peter is playing.  This man has the passion.

Just heard about Peter’s website homebuiltstrength.com and if you’re feeling sluggish, are thinking that you’d rather sit on the couch than get moving or are thinking it’s fine to look and feel like a beached whale, do yourself a huge favor and take a look at a couple of Peter’s videos: If you don’t get inspired, maybe you should have someone check your pulse and call 911 before it’s too late

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by Randall J. Strossen, Ph.D. | ©2014 IronMind

Washington, DC police officer and Andrews AFB Air Force Reservist Tom Scibelli has just proven that the IronMind Red Nail is no match for him as he has been certified on this benchmark short steel bend.

6’ 1” tall, 215-lb. Tom Scibelli has just been certified on the IronMind Red Nail: “I became interested in grip and bending when I started my job as a police officer and realized that having a good grip was essential,” the Washington, DC police officer and Andrews AFB Air Force Reservist told IronMind.  IronMind® | Photo courtesy of Tom Scibelli.
6’ 1” tall, 215-lb. Tom Scibelli has just been certified on the IronMind Red Nail: “I became interested in grip and bending when I started my job as a police officer and realized that having a good grip was essential,” the Washington, DC police officer and Andrews AFB Air Force Reservist told IronMind.  IronMind® | Photo courtesy of Tom Scibelli.


“I became interested in grip and bending when I started my job as a police officer and realized that having a good grip was essential,” Scibelli told IronMind.  

“I searched the internet for grip strength, which lead me to the Captains of Crush grippers.  After 5 solid months of overall grip training, I discovered bending.  When I first started I could barely bend a yellow nail, but with pointers from Nathaniel Brous (Red Nail Roster ’13) and encouragement from Chris Dezendorf, I was headed on the right track for the Red.

“My goals are to continue bending bigger steel and developing overall grip strength.

“I’d like to thank my three children, Jacob, Andrew and Lydia for being my workout partners in my home gym as I trained for the Red Nail, my girlfriend Martina, and my referee Ryan Trudell for taking time out of his day to drive all the way to my house, Scibelli said.

Congratulations, Tom, your name has been added to the Red Nail Roster, and many thanks to Ryan Trudell for serving as the referee on Tom’s official attempt to bend an IronMind Red Nail.

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by Randall J. Strossen, Ph.D. | ©2014 IronMind

Alexey Tyukalov and Rich Williams might have some of the very strongest hands in the world, but they won’t be able to coast at the upcoming IronMind Record Breakers— because Mike Burke has just tossed his hat into the ring, too.

Wondering if you’ll ever close a Captains of Crush No. 3 gripper? 

Wondering if you’ll ever close a Captains of Crush No. 3 gripper?  Mike Burke held the CoC Silver Bullet for a whopping 53.97 seconds, for a new world record.  Burke produced a sensational performance in the Visegrip Viking contest at the 2013 LA FitExp and he’ll be at IronMind Record Breakers at the NorCal FitExpo, facing the two men whose world records he broke in Los Angeles earlier this year—Alexey Tykulov and Rich Williams.  IronMind® | Randall J. Strossen photo.


Wondering if you’ll ever close a Captains of Crush No. 3 gripper?  Mike Burke held the CoC Silver Bullet for a whopping 53.97 seconds, for a new world record.  Burke produced a sensational performance in the Visegrip Viking contest at the 2013 LA FitExp and he’ll be at IronMind Record Breakers at the NorCal FitExpo, facing the two men whose world records he broke in Los Angeles earlier this year—Alexey Tykulov and Rich Williams.  IronMind® | Randall J. Strossen photo.




Odd Haugen, known for putting on the world’s top tier grip contests, set a high water mark at the LA FitExpo in January and few would have thought that contest could ever be outdone, but Haugen’s lineup for the NorCal FitExpo is poised to make LA look like a warmup.

Mike Burke was so dominant as he crushed his competition along with world records that his middle name might have been Mayhem, but he didn’t have to deal with Tyukalov or Williams, the men whose world records he broke in the CoC Silver Bullet Hold and the Apollon’s Axle Double Overhand Deadlift, respectively.

Now, for the first time in the world, Haugen will be presenting all three champions on one stage, going head to head on the best known and most widely established tests of grip strength.

After demolishing the world record on the IronMind Apollon’s Axle Deadlift not once, but twice, Mike Burke pulled 240 kg to knee height, signaling where he’s planning to go with this lift.  In June, Burke will square off with the man whose world record he broke on this lift, the mighty Rich Williams.  IronMind® | Randall J. Strossen photo.

After demolishing the world record on the IronMind Apollon’s Axle Deadlift not once, but twice, Mike Burke pulled 240 kg to knee height, signaling where he’s planning to go with this lift.  In June, Burke will square off with the man whose world record he broke on this lift, the mighty Rich Williams.  IronMind® | Randall J. Strossen photo.


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by Randall J. Strossen, Ph.D. | ©2014 IronMind

He’s a legend in the grip strength world, the man who certified on a Captains of Crush No. 3.5 gripper with very little training and for years held the world record on the Apollon’s Axle Double Overhand Deadlift at a mighty 501 lb.

At 6' 3" tall and about 410 lb., Christian Evangelist Rich Williams is a formidable figure—something that he can easily demonstrate with the raw power of his hands.  IronMind® | Photo courtesy of Rich Williams.
At 6' 3" tall and about 410 lb., Christian Evangelist Rich Williams is a formidable force, something that he can easily demonstrate with the raw power of his hands.  IronMind® | Photo courtesy of Rich Williams.


Rich Williams has stood alone in thick handled feats of grip strength and was the first man in the world to certify on both the Captains of Crush No. 3 and No. 3.5 grippers on the same day.  IronMind® | Photo courtesy of Bert Sorin.

That was a number nobody could approach until Mike Burke exceeded it at Odd Haugen’s grip contest at the LA FitExpo earlier this year, but just as Burke has more in the tank, Williams told IronMind that he has done well over 500 lb. on multiple occasions, so if you want to see a new world record in the Apollon’s Axle, come to the NorCal FitExpo, where Odd Haugen’s latest strength extravaganza will include the IronMind Record Breakers.

Williams is stoked, telling IronMind that unlike the rumors that he had retired from grip contests, he is eager to compete and for the grip strength world this means that Haugen is likely to exceed the high water mark he established at the LA FitExpo in January, where Mike Burke delivered a sensational performance—the stage is set for that to become the opening act for the IronMind Record Breakers, with a field that now includes the one and only Rich Williams.


Rich Williams was the first man in the world to certify on both the Captains of Crush No. 3 and No. 3.5 grippers on the same day.  IronMind® | Photo courtesy of Jeff Goergen.
Rich Williams was the first man in the world to certify on both the Captains of Crush No. 3 and No. 3.5 grippers on the same day.  IronMind® | Photo courtesy of Jeff Goergen.

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by Randall J. Strossen, Ph.D. | ©2014 IronMind

Jim Schmitz explains the Miyake High Pull, named after two-time Olympic gold medalist Yoshinobu Miyake.

Yoshinobu Miyake keeps a close eye on Nicu Vlad at The Sports Palace, where the Olympic gold medalists were visiting Jim Schmitz and wowing their fellow weightlifters.  IronMind® | Randall J. Strossen photo.
Yoshinobu Miyake keeps a close eye on Nicu Vlad at The Sports Palace, where the Olympic gold medalists were visiting Jim Schmitz and wowing their fellow weightlifters.  IronMind® | Randall J. Strossen photo.


Whether you are a lifter, coach or Olympic weightlifting fan, this is a must-read article by Jim Schmitz, whose many credits in the sport include being the coach of the last American man to win an Olympic medal in weightlifting, Mario Martinez.

Click on the Article button on the IronMind homepage and select the Schmitz on the Lifts from the menu or click on this link to go directly to Miyake High Pull.


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